A Room In Memphis

I'm sorry, this story has left my small-town website in search of a better life in print. It will return some day with tales of travel, rejection, yearning, and, hopefully, life in print.

January 17, 2016

The office at the front of Memphis Recording Service, where Keisker accepted $3.98 plus tax from a young kid for a record he recorded for his mother's birthday.

The office at the front of Memphis Recording Service, where Keisker accepted $3.98 plus tax from a young kid for a record he recorded for his mother's birthday.

The room where music, and the world, changed on July 5th, 1954.

The room where music, and the world, changed on July 5th, 1954.

"That's All Right." It proved more than all right.

"That's All Right." It proved more than all right.

In the studio: Elvis Presley, Bill Black, Scotty Moore, and Sam Phillips. Sun Studio/New York Times photo.

In the studio: Elvis Presley, Bill Black, Scotty Moore, and Sam Phillips. Sun Studio/New York Times photo.


Sun Studio is a must-see for any fan of rock, rockabilly, blues, or country music. Miraculously, the original studio remained intact inside 706 Union Avenue even after Phillips moved his studio to a different location in 1959. The studio is now permanently preserved, as it was when it served as the womb for rock and roll, and is again an active recording studio. Many high-profile contemporary artists have used the studio, including U2 for their Rattle and Hum album. Studio tour begins in what was Taylor's Restaurant next door, where Moore and Phillips decided on July 4th, 1954 to give the unknown Presley another shot. That space, fittingly, now serves as a soda-fountain and gift shop for Sun Studio.